Hoop Safety, Ouch!

This isn’t the hula hooping of your childhood! These hoops are heavier and provide you with an excellent all over cardio workout. When learning you may get bruises if you are really going for it. Particularly on the hips, the back of the hands and anywhere else you may happen to hit yourself (ankles, elbows and knees!). They are only minor injuries and you might grow quite proud of them – from extreeeeeeeeme hooping!
Expect to drop the Hoop! – If there are no failures, there would be no success!
This is perfectly normal. As you progress you will find that you don’t get these bruises any more. With practise you will gain better control of the hoop and will keep it spinning more easily above your hip bone rather than knocking against it.

It is a good idea to wear clothing made from natural materials like cotton – most tracksuit bottoms and t-shirts will be fine. This will help the hoop ‘stick’ to your body and reduce the number of times it falls!

Wear trainers or pumps to protect those feet and toes!

Once you’ve progressed and feel ready to move onto more complicated moves you will find that bare skin is the best surface for hooping on. By this stage you will be more controlled with the hoop and warm bare skin provides great grip for the hoop to whirl around.

If you are learning hoop dance moves then you might want to consider a lighter hoop (3/4 inch rather than standard 1 inch) as you will be lifting the hoop a lot and spinning it across more parts of the body. Tight fitting clothing is great so you don’t get yourself twisted in your outfit. If you’re considering a performance outfit then PRACTISE, PRACTISE, PRACTISE in it before you put yourself in front of a crowd. Trust me – you don’t want your top sliding down uncontrollably as you spin up a storm!

Small Children and BIG Hoops!
REMEMBER that as the standard hoops are designed for recreational use by adults, they are not intended for children and the smaller lighter hoops available in my shop will be more appropriate.

Many health benefits are associated with this form of exercise and for most people starting a new exercise regime will not pose any significant risk but it is always recommended that you seek medical advice before beginning any new activity.